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Plenary Speakers


Monday, 23 October

8:45-9:15 - Burnout in Healthcare: An Overview and Framework for Interventions

Colin West
Colin West
Mayo Clinic
Biography
Health care professionals can only provide the highest-quality care to patients if they themselves are well. Unfortunately, dissatisfaction and burnout are highly prevalent across the learning continuum in medicine, with concerning consequences on patient outcomes, health care professional mental health, public safety, health care costs, and the health care workforce. Individuals, organizations, and the health care system as a whole have a shared responsibility to address key drivers of distress and promote well-being. As these issues have become increasingly recognized, evidence on an effective framework for solutions has emerged.

9:15-9:45 - The Imperative for Changing the Learning Environment in Health Professions Education: The Time is Now

Stuart Slavin
Stuart Slavin
Saint Louis University School of Medicine
Biography
Educators have increasingly recognized the problem of poor mental health of students in the health professions. New programs are being implemented to address this but to date have largely focused on the individual with approaches such as mindfulness and resilience training. While these interventions are appropriate and much needed, they may be insufficient. The situation needs to be viewed as an environmental health problem and efforts should be made to try to reduce the toxicity of the learning environment itself. This presentation will describe the approach and outcomes of a multi-faceted, integrated program implemented at Saint Louis University School of Medicine designed to improve student well-being that could serve as a model for change in other health professions education schools and settings.

Tuesday, 24 October

8:30-9:00 - Science and Practice of Mindfulness and Compassion

Philippe Goldin
Philippe Goldin
University of California Davis
Biography
There is a huge need to provide training that supports compassion, insight, and emotional resilience. The goals of this presentation are to present neuroimaging and behavioral research on the effects of mindfulness and compassion meditation in clinical and non-clinical samples, to introduce specific contemplative practices, and to discuss how mindfulness and compassion training programs are and can be integrated into healthcare for both the providers and recipients of healthcare.

9:00-9:30 - Why We Need Empathy to be Compassionate

Helen Riess
Helen Riess
Massachusetts General Hospital
Biography
Dr. Riess presents a compelling case for imbuing empathy education in medical training programs. Despite widespread agreement about the importance of empathy in healthcare, it has been vaguely defined and confused with sympathy, compassion and mindfulness. Based on definitions supported by neurobiology, she will present why empathic capacity is necessary to demonstrate genuine compassion.

Wednesday, 25 October

8:30-9:00 - Resilience Leading to Improved Patient Safety

Susan Moffatt-Bruce
Susan Moffatt-Bruce
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Biography
Physicians of all levels and specialties are being faced with external forces that renders caring for patients often stressful and even create unsafe environments for patients and providers. With governmental changes, payer contracting and consumerism driven healthcare, there are many externalities that affect physicians who often feel unable to impact their own provision of care. Dr. Moffatt-Bruce will present the national landscape around the value proposition whereby quality and cost are at the forefront of our attention and potentially distracting to the actual quality of care we deliver. The role of public reporting and the effect on providers will be also introduced as a reality as all providers are facing this; discussion around how physicians might impact measurement will be introduced. Lastly, considering the current healthcare environment, ways in which physicians and residents might best become more resilient through dedicated, mindfulness training, will be shared. Metrics of success that can be measured and tracked across the care continuum will be presented and ways in which these metrics might be shared with all care providers will be discussed. Ways in which other healthcare environments might adopt similar programs and measurement strategies will be highlighted.

9:00-9:30 - A System Approach to Well-Being in the Health Care Workforce

David Entwistle
David Entwistle
Stanford Health Care
Biography
Hospitals and health systems are major contributors to the sources of stress that may cause physician burnout. From adoption of electronic medical records, to increasing emphasis on patient satisfaction, adding requirements for other metrics, and even posting physician scorecards online, changing expectations and requirements are now the norm. David Entwistle will present Stanford Health Care’s approach to addressing physician wellness on a system-wide basis. Stanford has developed a model that is broadly applicable and that places professional fulfillment rather than burnout at its core. In addition to underscoring that the institution cares about the individuals who devote their lives to healing, Stanford’s system-wide approach recognizes that physician burnout threatens quality, reduces patient satisfaction, limits access and increases costs. He will also highlight specific initiatives underway at Stanford to measure, assess and improve physician wellness and well-being.